Favorite Moments - 001-025 Your fun memories from EOTB

fm04 - Memories of Old Leeds player Jack Fairbank Year of Story 1961

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Marshall Warnop
Alicante
Spain
Leeds .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




I remember big Jack Fairbank playing for Leeds.

As Leeds kicked off he caught the ball and ran 50 yds to touch down in the corner but before putting the ball down he stopped on the line and waited for two of the opposition to come and tackle him, he pushed them away as if swatting a fly then put the ball down, he was a real comedian.

Another incident....Leeds were penalised and the opposition were given a very kickable penalty...there was a bit of a rumpus and the ref had to go and sort it out..the ref dropped his white handkerchief at the point where the penalty would be taken...Big Jack moved it about 15yds nearer the touchline to the amusement of all in the Southstand. He missed the penalty.

Great days

Best of luck
Marshall

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm-05 - A Old memory of Wigan hardman Alan Davies, making good the use of the newly introduced replacement rule

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Martin King
-
Singapore
NA .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE






Favorite Moment involving Alan Davies, Wigan /oldham.

In the very early days of substitutes, Wigan played Saints in a Cup tie at central Park.

Dismay for Wigan as Boston had to be substituted--no.14, Alan Davies.

In 10 minutes, Davies had laid out 3 men(including Cynedd Williams, len killen?--I would have to check the details-)but my abiding memory is of the assassin marching quickly away from the scene of the crime, like an efficient hitman--just another day at the office.....

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm06 - RONNIE GIBBS IN LAR LAR LAND AND TELEVISED

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Mick Carr
Wakefield
UK
NA .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE






(another entry below Micks, from Select of Castleford)

approx date and year of story= Winter 1992(ish)

My favourite moment involved Ronnie Gibbs and a Wakefield player called Phil Edens knee.

Just prior to half time Phil Eden drove in the ball,Ronnie as was his want went in with a mammouth hit to knock the stuffing out of Phil,unfortunately he slightly mistimed the tackle and took a knee to the head!As Ronnie stood up he was obviously in cloud cuckoo land, he bobbed, he weaved, the guy just couldn't stand straight, this must have lasted a good minute till the hooter went for half time.

The match was being televised in England so as the players left the field a roving reporter entered the field of play and made straight for Ronnie,asking as he left the field, "Ronnie you took a big hit there do you think you'll be back out for the second half?"

To which Ronnie replied "Dunno mate you'll have to ask the coach"Absolutely priceless!!! As the program finished the BBC did a montage playing out with wishing on a star!

Quigs - Thanks for the great story Mick. When Rambo Ronnie was playing out here he come under close scrutiny for his tackling style when he would target the opposition players rigid leg only as he was in the process of kicking during play. I think the "wisemen" decreed that it was a form of dangerous and reckless tackling.....not 100% here but I think it happend.


Name

Hometown

Country

Club followed

Email: (not compulsory)

Your Web URL

Select Paving
Castleford
UK
-
Selectpaving@aol.com

Hi there, i grew up supporting and then playing for the castleford tigers, my hero as i grew up was a man by the name of Ronnie Rambo Gibbs, he was a tough no nonsence second rower as u will probably know, why isnt he on your mad players page, get him on quick!!!

Great website

(From Quigs - Thanks a lot for your email Select -- Yeah I agree Ronnie was a wild man, but he unfortunately slips outside the timespan I am roughly using for this website. I am trying to keep it close to the early 80's, some have slipped through I know. But I guess I had to draw the line somewhere.) .

Name

Hometown

Country

Club followed

Email: (not compulsory)

Your Web URL

Sandshouse - Steve
Hull
UK

As far as Ronnie Gibbs goes, I watched him "tackle" our kicker in a match at Castleford once and as you say he targeted the standing leg.

Our kicker, Gary Pearce never fully recovered and ended up playing Rah Rah on one leg.

For what its worth hes still playing and doing a good job but I think that Gibbs should have been shot.

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm07 - A BRILLIANT NIGHT IN BRADFORD, HOSPITALITY AND HISTORY ALL IN ONE NIGHT

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Quigs - the webmaster
Emu Park
Australia
Cronulla .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




During the RLW Supporters tour of the Uk we had a four day break between games. The previous night (4/11/90) we had watch the Aussie put away Castleford in freezing conditions. Out of the blue one of the tour guides had received an invitation from the Bradford Northern Rugby Football Club for anyone interested in attending a function at the Bradford Club. It was a very generous invitation and included a free feed, some drinks, free entertainment, and a chance for the Northern supporters to meet and greet us, as unfortunately for them, and at the time their side was not in the Top Grade and did not play the Aussies during the 90 Tour.

Three bus loads ( the poms call em coaches ) of us supporters made the trip to Bradfords Clubhouse and it proved to be one of the best nights I had on the tour. Their friendly hospitality and the great banter between the "Old Foes" made for a brilliant night. They left no stone unturned to make us welcomed. The meal was great, the beer was good, (cold) the entertainment wonderful, and the company brilliant.

As part of the deal we had to walk from the auditorium area of the club across a narrow lane way to get our meal. That part of the club was, if I remember correctly was also the offices of the club itself.

Whilst inside I noticed the large picture of the aerial view of the world record crowd that were present during the 1954 Challenge Cup Replay played before 102,000 spectators. I was explaining this to a couple of the younger guys on the tour when a gentleman behind me started to politely tell us about the day and the game. He then introduced himself as Jack Bates, the Chairman of the Club. Whilst he was telling us about the historic day he asked ifwe would like to see the ground. I said, No because I knew obviously it was night and he would have to fire up the lighting and also that it would involve some effort and time on his part, and at an expense to the Club, and I for one did not want to be a pain in the butt. But this kind man would not take no for an answer as he could see that we were sincerely interested in the ground and the famous picture on the wall.

(During a later tour the Channel Nine Australia TV Guys, Sterlo, Vautin etc used the same pic as a backdrop to their telecast from the ground.)

Jack shepherded back across the laneway through the auditorium and out onto a viewing platform. Below us was nothing but fog and mist and darkness. Slowly and eerily the huge floodlights came on and started to penetrate the fog.

After several minutes an oval started to materialize, it was like it was situated at the bottom of a huge bomb crater. It was a magnificent sight and one that I will never forget. When the oval was fully exposed I could not help but imagine what it would be like with 102,000 people sitting there watching a game. It must of been a wonderful experience.

Most of the other tourists took advantage of this experience and many thanks to Mr Bates.

Back in the auditorium the night just got better as time flew. The aussies delivered the knockout blow when we won the singalong when the RLW Cartoonist Scott Rigley led a brilliant rendition of Rolf Harris's two little boys ---- christ who could compete against that.

(I look back on that experience and think, what aussie club would put on a free feed, drinks and entertainment for three bus loads (sorry poms, coaches) of visiting supporters, and even when their club was not playing against the visiting touring side.) MANY THANKS TO JACK BATES AND BRADFORD FROM THIS BLOCKHEAD FROM EMU PARK QUEENSLAND.

Help me out here Bradford, or a Warrington or Halifax supporter, I would love to include stories about that famous game in Memorable Matches ----email me.

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm08 - A golden moment of Biff executed by an Aussie on a cold afternoon in Blackpool Mark Harrigan, Rochdale Hornets, formerly a Manly Warringah man

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Jim Stringer
Rochdale Hornets Man
UK
Hornets .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




Mark Harrigan remembered

Rugby League players have to go some to make an impact in one season - especially if they only play for a club for one season. In the last 20 yearsthere have been a few exceptional players to have pulled on the red, white and blue jersey and, during the 1986/87 season Mark Harrigan carved for himself a special niche in Rochdale Hornets folklore.

He was a nuggety little fullback, signed I think from Manly, and his 'moment' came in a game against Blackpool Borough at Borough Park. In a particularly nasty game, he'd been the victim of a brutal tackle that left his face cut and his eye almost closed. He was taken from the field for treatment and stitches. The ref chose not to see the incident.

As Mark walked off past us, he looked a real mess and we expected that to be the last we'd see of him in the game. Amazingly, with about quarter of an hour to go, he emerged from the tunnel, freshly stitched, bandaged and with his eye swollen, badly bruised and fully shut. He all but insisted on going back on the field. Five minutes into his return, the prop that had executed the head tackle on Mark broke the defence and found himself in open field with only Harrigan between him and the tryline. Harrigan stood his ground, almost daring the prop to step him. The prop dodged left and, instead of tackling him, Mark Harrigan produced quite the most exquisite straight arm tackle I've ever seen. The prop's head stayed put, his legs flew parallel to the ground and with a sickening grunt he hit the deck spark out.

Harrigan didn't even wait for the ref. He walked straight past the prostrate prop and, smiling, straight down the tunnel with the wild applause of the Hornets fans ringing in his ears. Whilst not condoning deliberate violence, it was the most perfectly executed and most deserved piece of on-field retribution I've ever seen.

And it was typical of Mark Harrigan's style. Whilst not the biggest of Rugby League players he showed courage above his physical stature and for that season stood a stubborn last line in a frequently punctured Hornets defence. And then he was gone.

One season of solid, hardworking graftsurmounted by a moment of extreme courage. Bigger players would have called it a day that afternoon at Borough Park, but Mark Harrigan had unfinished business and dragged himself back out there to balance the slate.

We know that he did it for himself - to show that, despite his size, you couldn't mess with him. But that he did it in a Hornets jersey makes him a bona fide Hornets folk hero, remembered always for what we still speak of, admiringly, as "THAT Mark Harrigan tackle". So, in a way, he did it for all of us too

THANKS TO JIM STRINGER A MIGHTY ROCHDALE HORNETS SUPPORTER.....VISIT THE SUPPORTERS SITE BY CLICKING HERE

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm09 - Lowly Bradford beats the mighty Wigan Rugby League Team. And Ellery Hanley gets marched by the Ref

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Greg Milner
Bradford
England
Bradford .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




........Lowly Bradford beat the mighty Wigan

The date was 30/09/1990. It was bloody freezing and I'd dragged my brother along for his first game of RL, wigan at the time where the darlings of Rugby League over here and Bradford where the minnows, with my brother having a soft spot for wigan I'd thought i would take him, expecting wigan to wallop us, i wasn't expecting the show we put on that day, we where awesome, we ended up winning 31-30, with Craig Richard's our replacement prop for Kelvin Skirt who was playing for wigan, im not kidding when i say Richard's picked skirt up in one of his many tackles on him and through him to the floor like he was a rag doll which produced the second biggest cheer of the afternoon however the first was reserved for an ex Northern legend Allergy Haley. Probably my favourite player of all time, but he had a tendency to talk to the referee at every given opportunity, however the ref for this match was the no nonsense Robin Whittled.

One of the most hated of referees in this country, but he soon became The Northern fans Favourite after too much back chat from ellery again, who he dispatched to the stands at half time with little andy greg having to restrain allergy from knocking whitfileds head off, as well as 10'000 screaming Northern fans sending him on his way.

Hanley would however walk into any 13 a side team now or in the past one of the best players of all time and im glad i was one of the thousands of fans who managed to see him play.

GB could do with him now!

Feel free to tidy it up and spell check it im not the best of story tellers but that memory will stick with me to my dieing day!

Great website btw im just a little bit too young to remember most of the ex players on here, im glad I had a nosy though!

(from Quigs, Thanks Greg this is exactly what I am chasing for the EOTB website, told as it is by those that witnessed it)

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm10 - Warrington v Wigan, 1 January, 1988 NEW YEAR'S DAY PUNCH-UP

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Eddie Gordo
Warrington
England
Warrington .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




Warrington v Wigan, 1 January, 1988
NEW YEAR'S DAY PUNCH-UP - WILDERSPOOL



Posted by Quigs - Found this link 11/5/2012, from the Talkin Sports Website
VIDEO LINK ... Warrington v Wigan - World War 3..New Year’s Day 1988 saw absolute mayhem happen. Les Boyd started an all in Brawl and then Paul Cullen react to being flattened by Andy Goodway.

Link Ref includes players ..43,98,


has staged many bad tempered matches but nothing compares to the New Year's Day 'derby' against Wigan in 1988.

While the game itself had a dramatic finale, it was the opening 20 minutes which captured all the headlines.

Wilderspool's biggest 'gate' of the season and highest league attendance for 15 years - 10,056 - ended up watching an 11-a-side game.

Southport referee Kevin Allatt sent four players off as the game boiled over. Another player was sent to the sin bin.

Afterwards, Warrington coach Tony Barrow described the episode as 'World War Three.'

The start was delayed eight minutes to allow the crowd to get in but on the pitch there was trouble from the first minute as Warrington's Les Boyd and Wigan's Adrian Shelford clashed.



There were other clashes before the game errupted on eight minutes, when Boyd and Andy Gregory tangled. Players from both sides piled in and Allatt ended up sending off Warrington's Tony Humphries with Wigan's Shelford.

Boyd was ordered to the sin bin. Even that did not end the hostility for on 20 minutes Wigan second rower Andy Goodway, currently the Great Britain coach, felled Paul Cullen and was sent marching to the tunnel.

As Goodway walked to the tunnel Cullen chased after him and launched himself at the Wigan player. A new brawl erupted and Cullen and Goodway had to be separated before the Warrington centre was also dismissed.

Cullen's moment of madness cost him a two match ban and probably cost Warrington victory, although Tony Barrow claimed at the time that Goodway had stamped on Cullen as he trooped towards the exit.

Thankfully, that was the end of the scenes but the game had already been tarnished. Wigan then opened the scoring when Ellery Hanley broke clear from the half way line.

Warrington responded with Australian Boyd leading the fightback. His power running set up touch downs for Billy McGinty and Brian Johnson. A drop goal from John Woods just before half-time gave Warrington a 13-4 advantage.

Then Gregory added his influence. His kick brought a try for Steve Hampson and then he was involved in the play that put Hanley over for his second try that gave Wigan a 14-13 lead.

Woods put over a penalty for off side but Gregory's drop goal two minutes from the end gave them a share of the spoils.

Warrington were in second place in the Stones Bitter Championship at the time - chasing Widnes for the title.

Result: Warrington 15 Wigan 15

Team:

Brian Johnson; Des Drummond, Paul Cullen, Joe Ropati, David Lyon; John Woods, Martin Crompton; Les Boyd, Kevin Tamati, Tony Humphries, Bob Jackson, Ronnie Duane, Billy McGinty.

Subs: Mark Roberts, Gary Sanderson.

Tries: McGinty, Johnson.

Goals: Woods 3.

Drop goal: Woods.

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm13 - Paul (Saint of Hull) Close encounters as a kid with some of the greats

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Paul (Saint of Hull)
-
UK
Saints .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




I was a Hull Kingston Rovers fan as a boy but fell out with Rovers and Rugby in general for a number of years and it was watching Saints on Sky that got me back into the game around 1999.

I grew up opposite the Zetland Arms where my mum worked as a barmaid for 25 years which was owned and ran by Colin Hutton, the ex Rovers, Great Britain Coach, Manager and Chariman etc.

I had the pleasure of growing up with a whole host of stars living and visiting the pub across the road from me.

I played dominos with Gavin Miller, got my arse kicked by Roger Millward (several times), played in my back garden with John Dorahays kids, and looked on in awe when the New Zealand tour bus pulled up outside my house to go to a function in there and waited for Clayton Friend to get off the bog for his autograph.

One of the best memories I have is the "hardman" of the era - Mark Broadhurst - still on the pitch 30 mins after the game signing autographs for fans.

It just goes to show that some of these hardmen are true gentlemen and soft as shite on the inside.

Next time I'm in my loft I'll try and dig some photos etc out that I think I have somewhere.

Regards

Paul

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm11 - 1971 My First visit to Wembley, We nearly fooled Dad.

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Gary Kitchen
Leeds
England
Leeds .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




Wembley 1971

In 1971 Leeds reached the Challenge Cup Final. I'd been taken to the semi-final at Odsal by my dad and his mate, a match memorable only for the fierce hail and rain downpour late in the second half which saw us breaking down a wire fence to get under cover.

On the Monday morning at school there was no doubt in our minds, Patrick Stewart, Rodney Emmott and me were going to Wembley for the final. There was no question that it wouldn't happen, we were 14 years old and worldly-wise, we had Saturday jobs that gave us cash-in-pocket and we knew that tickets for the final were on sale later that week.

We all decided that a fait-acomplis was the best approach - there was no point in telling our parents before we'd got the tickets because there was no way that they would let us go, so after school on the Thursday the three of us caught the bus into Headingley, queued up the stairs to the tiny ticket office behind the north stand and bought three upper tier standing tickets for the final.

I sat on the bus staring at my ticket all the way home - equivalent today to a space shuttle ticket to the moon I could not believe that we had done it - we were going to Wembley.

Or at least we were going to Wembley until my dad found out.

Suprisingly he wasn't annoyed. I told him the following evening that we wanted to go, when he said we couldn't (we were too young, it was too expensive, it was too far) I showed him the ticket and stated very proudly that it was all organised - he just looked at me and said "how are you going to get there then ?"

Now we hadn't actually thought that bit through yet, in fact it would be true to say that the thought had never crossed our mind. Of course a 14 year old can't admit to his dad that he didn't think about such a basic thing as "how do we get there ?", and so I told him that Rodney's dad was giving us a lift.

My dad never said a word, it was the first thing that had come to my mind and I didn't know that he knew that Rodney's dad didn't have a car, in fact he couldn't drive. Three days later my dad came home and told me that we owed him £4.50, the cost of three coach tickets with the supporters club coach. He fixed it just like that, never said another word, he went out and pulled a few strings, asked a few favours of some mates and found us three seats on the supporters club coach, plus a promise from a mate who was booked on the same bus that he'd look out for us - amazing, another one of lifes great lessons, if you cant persuade your kids not to do something then at least make sure they do it properly.

The trip to Wembley started early, we left Headingley at around 7am in an old tour bus that had seen its best days in world war two, I swear that it had blackout curtains and a sign above the drivers seat that read "careless lips cost ships". We arrived at Wembley many hours later, absolutely knackered after stopping at most of the service stations on the nearly completed M1 - most of our fellow passengers were pensioners with delicate bladders, in fact it was only the presence of us three 14 year olds that kept the average age on the bus below 80.

As usual the match itself passed oh so quickly - I never fail to be amazed how every challenge cup game, whatever round, always passes quickly. Ten minutes after kick-off its half time, quarter of an hour later you're in the car on the way home.

The 1971 final was famous for two things, the Leeds centre Syd Hynes flattened the Leigh stand-off Alex Murphy and our tickets earned us a place standing on the last row at the back of the stadium, two hundred yards away from the pitch - we needed eyes like superman's to recognise even the vaguest of details.

We did however see the sending off incident, and never did a player deserve a good chinning like Alex Murphy. It was worth having one of your players go down in dubious history as the first player ever to be sent off at Wembley, just to see Alex Murphy carried off the pitch unconcious on a stretcher. Our joy however was short lived as Mr Murphy was faking it, jumping from the stretcher as soon as he reached the players tunnel beneath us, Syd should have hit him harder.

We were beaten that day and thus began the journey back up the M1 in a bus full of fed-up supporters, a journey that would become familiar to me in later years, inquests going on in every row of the bus, everyone agreeing that Murphy had conned the referee, that Syd should have hit him a couple more times for good luck, on and on into the night as our WWII bus shook its way back up the M1 at a breathtaking 40mph, cardboard gas mask holders falling from the luggage rack at every lurch. .

COMMENT ADDED 1/12/2004 From Londoner - off Leigh RL forum----

quigs,

There is a story on your biff website from Gary Kitchen (Leeds UK) regarding Alex Murphy in the '71 cupfinal. He was carried off and never came back on the pitch. He did however reappear to lift the trophy. At the time he was carried off and syd hynes was sent off leigh had all but won the game.

It was alleged that murph winked as he was being carried off. But he certainly didn't jump off the stretcher and rejoin play.

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

fm12 - Lucky Break, off to Wembley, For the Second Time, 1977 Leeds -v- Widnes

Posted by quigs eraofthebiff - Monday, May 14, 2012
Gary Kitchen
Leeds
England
Leeds .. is the club I follow
 

Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE

Have you got your own Favorite Moment from the Biff Era that you would like to Share with us ...

CLICK HERE




Wembley 1977

Six years on and another Wembley final, and this time the first of many weekend stopovers. We hadn't meant to stay in London, we'd bought the tickets and were going to travel to London in my company escort van, which would have been rather incomfortable for at least one of the three of us - the one who would have to slide around in the back admist coils of cable and electrical switchgear.

We were playing dominoes in the Queenswood club on a Friday night the week before the final - loser travels in the back - when an announcement was made that three vacancies had arisen on the Queenswood club weekend trip to Wembley.

To qualify for the world famous Queenswood trip to Wembley every year you had to ;

1) be male (absolutely no women allowed)

2) take plenty of spending money

3) have the constitution of Oliver Reeds liver.

We qualified - just - and one minute later were stood in front of the Queenswood club committee swearing allegience to the cause (dont EVER tell anyones wife what they got up to), and promising to be blind drunk from Friday morning to Sunday evening.

There was however one problem, the committee had booked us all into the Strand Palace hotel, located just off Trafalger Square it was very very posh, (we were forewarned about the bar prices) - and it had twin rooms, which meant that one of us was going to have to share with an old chap called Maurice. Now I'm sure that Maurice was a very nice chap, but we had plans to stay out very late and be very, very drunk by the time we got back to the hotel each evening, and the thought of one of us tiptoeing into our room to be met by Maurice, sat up in bed in his flat cap and nightshirt demanding to know where we thought we had been and what sort of state is that to come home to - didn't exactly fill us with glee - nor did the thought of explaining to him the next morning exactly what it was that we were doing in the sink at 4am that morning.

We played dominoes for him - best of three, then best of five, seven, nine, on and on we went, cheating, accusing the others of cheating, determined not to be the one to share with Maurice, until eventually last orders was called and we still hadn't decided.

We still hadn't decided when we got on the Wallace Arnold coach the following Friday, but each of us knew that it wouldn't be us.

The whole of the party gathered together in the crystal chandaliered lobby of the Strand Palace whilst the club secretary called out the paired-off names and handed out the room keys - Maurices name was called and he turned to us (a right miserable sod he looked too) - "which one of you lot is sharing with me then, come on I 'aven't got all day".

We nudged each other forward, none willing to take on the role of Maurices bed partner, when suddenly our names were called out. Grabbing the keys I raced for the lifts dragging my overnight bag with me and shoving one of my mates towards Maurice - lifts not available I charged up the stairs, closely followed by my two mates - this was going to be a race to the death, first two to claim a bed get to sacrifice the third on Maurices alter.

Reaching the first floor I checked the key - room number 505, shit, four more floors to go, the fight was getting dirty by now, the other two daren't overtake me as they didn't know the room number, but they were on my heels by now - literally grabbing my ankles and pulling me back down the stairs - up three steps, back down two.

Punches were thrown, bags clattered into heads, curses uttered, at one point all three of us rolled back down a full half flight of stairs, a ball of arms, legs, bags and flying fists, much to the disgust of the other paying guests who thought that they had booked into a quiet, sophisticated, high class central London hotel - we were to prove them wrong several times that weekend.

Eventually room 505 was reached, three hands grappled with the key and door handle, three bodies tried to squeeze through the door at once, eyes were gouged, ribs were jabbed and testicles squeezed - it was as dirty as it gets, but the stakes were high. Three bodies flung themselves onto the nearest bed and three exhausted lads on a weekend outing continued the fight to roll the other two off the bed.

We called a truce - the only honourable thing to do, after all it was mid afternoon and pubs in London were open all day, we had beer to drink, we were on a weekend outing and we weren't drunk yet, this was no time to argue over the sleeping arrangements.

Much later on that night, after a tour of most of central London's taverns we found ourselves in Soho - the porn district - so of course it was compulsory to do the tourist thing and go watch a slightly risque film - (not the sort of thing usually shown at the Cottage Road anyway). A cinema was quickly selected and a film chosen - "Come Play With Me" starring Mary Millington, the doorman said it had been nominated for several oscars and would be an education for us.

What he didn't tell us was that it would take the last of our spending money to "join" the "private cinema club" and that after paying our "membership fee" we would have to wait outside for an hour before we could go in. Sure enough we went along with this and an hour later found ourselves in a very dark room seated in front of a very small, portable screen waiting for the film to start.

I wish that I could recount what the film was all about but the truth is that we were awoken an hour later by the doorman who asked us to leave as our snoring was upsetting the other "club members".

Staggering back to the hotel we reached an agreement on the sleeping arrangements - three of us would share two beds, and sod Maurice. In the room the two beds were pushed together, blankets and pillows shared out, a coin tossed and I won the middle bit - fantastic I thought, at least I won't get pushed off the bed during the night.

So it was that I awoke at 4.30am to find myself on the floor inbetween the two beds which had gradually parted during the night, still too drunk to do anything about it I lay there until 7am listening to my two so-called friends fart and snore their way through what was (to them) a very good nights sleep.

Match day beckoned and after a proper hang-over dominated english breakfast and a tour of the imperial war museum we took off to Wembley stadium. The history books show that Leeds beat Widnes that day to win the Challenge Cup, the star of the show being a very young Leeds scrum half, Kevin Dick who scrambled over between the posts to score the winning try. My memory also reminds me that we had seats (yes, seats, very posh in those days), right on the halfway line - I told you that the Queenswood club Wembley trip was renowned for its hospitality.

The history book is where I would have to go for more details on the match because to be truthfull I was soooo hungover that the whole day passed by in a blur - we had been drinking again at dinnertime in London, and again at the ground, and again after the match, and again when we got back to the hotel - the bar prices didn't matter at this stage. After a quick change it was out on the town for some serious drinking at which point the memory simply does not exist any more.

I do remember the sleeping arrangements that night though.

At 2am that morning, brains working overtime on copious amounts of alchohol, we decided that three sleeping the length of the bed didn't work, and we therefore nominated to remake the beds so that we could all sleep across them. Blankets and pillows re-distributed we settled down for a solid, (even if noisy and smelly) nights sleep, only to wake an hour later with all three of us sitting on the floor inbetween the two beds - they'd moved apart again.

The final solution was to dismantle the beds completely, stacking the bed frames against the wall and laying the matresses on the floor, this we achieved at around 4am and finally managed a couple of hours sleep.

Leaving the room in one hell of a mess the following morning to go home (the maid would literally have had to "make" both beds again) - we met Maurice on the landing whereupon he informed us that he had been looking out for us all weekend to do a room swap as his room had three beds in it.

(Quigs ---- sounds like old league supporters are the same the world over......)

 

Like to add your comment to this Favorite Moment from the Biff Era ... CLICK HERE

RETURN TO PREVIOUS PAGE


USE THIS SEARCH - it works
Search for Players - games or your own previous entries.

Recent Posts



Tags


    Archive


      Want to comment on this Favorite Moment entry ...CLICK HERE


      Copyright ©Era Of The Biff 2012. All Rights Reserved... Sitemap ...Website by Studioquigs